The point to be made clear is that, whatever may be our temperament, or our power in the presence of nature, we have to render what we actually see, forgetting everything that appeared before our own time. Which, I think, should enable the artist to express his personality to the full, be it large or small. Now that I am an old man, about seventy, the sensations of colour which produce light give rise to abstractions that prevent me from covering my canvas, and from trying to define the outlines of objects when their points of contact are tenuous and delicate; with the result that my image or picture is incomplete. For another thing, the planes become confused, superimposed; hence Neo-Impressionism, where everything is outlined in black, an error which must be uncompromisingly rejected. And nature, if consulted, shows us how to achieve this aim.

Paul Cezanne. A letter to Émile Bernhard, 23 October 1905, as quoted in “Letters of the great artists – from Blake to Pollock”, Richard Friedenthal, Thames and Hudson, London, 1963, p. 180

 

 

 

pencil in sketchbook, a5, 2012

 

after bacon.

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