revenant

pencil in sketchbook, a5, 2013

pencil in sketchbook, a5, 2013

 

 

fragment of a stone child.

 

patrick Keiller: http://dai.ly/xjehd1

 

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One thought on “revenant

  1. Reblogged this on chrisjayc's Blog and commented:
    A revenant is a visible ghost or animated corpse that was believed to return from the grave to terrorize the living.[1] The word “revenant” is derived from the Latin word, revenans, “returning” (see also the related French verb “revenir”, meaning “to come back”).

    Vivid stories of revenants arose in Western Europe (especially Great Britain, and were later carried by Anglo-Norman invaders to Ireland) during the High Middle Ages. Though later legend and folklore depicts revenants as returning for a specific purpose (e.g., revenge against the deceased’s killer), in most Medieval accounts they return to harass their surviving families and neighbours. Revenants share a number of characteristics with folkloric vampires.

    Medieval stories of revenants have common features. Those who return from the dead are wrongdoers in their lifetime, often described as wicked, vain, or unbelievers. Often the revenants are associated with the spreading of disease among the living. The appropriate response is usually exhumation, followed by some form of decapitation, and burning or removal of the heart.

    Several stories imply that sucking of blood has occurred.[3] Because of this, revenants have sometimes been described as “vampires” by a number of authors of popular books about vampire legends, starting with Montague Summers.[4] Medievalists are, however, largely skeptical towards this interpretation,[5] possibly because vampire legends are believed to have originated in Eastern European folklore and became known to the Western public only later through reports coming from the East in the 18th century. Vampires do not appear in Western fiction (with modifications) until the late 18th century and early 19th century, starting with authors such as Robert Southey, Lord Byron and John William Polidori. However, anthropologists and folklorists tend to blur distinctions between the various forms of “walking dead”, for which counterparts exist in the myths and legends of nearly every civilization dating back to earliest history.

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