nude

graphite on paper, 260 x 220 mm, 2014

graphite on paper, 260 x 220 mm, 2014

the orthodox

We see conventionally. It is not only that we think and act and speak and dress alike, because of our surrender to social attempt at Entity, in which we are only super-cellular. We see what it is “proper” that we should see. It is orthodox enough to say that a horse is not a horse, to an infant—any more than is an orange an orange to the unsophisticated. It’s interesting to walk along a street sometimes and look at things and wonder what they’d look like, if we hadn’t been taught to see horses and trees and houses as horses and trees and houses. I think that to super-sight they are local stresses merging indistinguishably into one another, in an all-inclusive nexus.

I think that it would be credible enough to say that many times have Monstrator and Elvera and Azuria crossed telescopic fields of vision, and were not even seen—because it wouldn’t be proper to see them; it wouldn’t be respectable, and it wouldn’t be respectful: it would be insulting to old bones to see them: it would bring on evil influences from the relics of St. Isaac to see them.

Charles Fort, ‘The Book of The Damned.’

pencil and pastel on paper, 210 x 297 mm, 2014

pencil and pastel on paper, 210 x 297 mm, 2014

revolving iii

pencil & pastel on paper, 190 x 80 mm, 2014

pencil & pastel on paper, 190 x 80 mm, 2014

J S Bach

Pencil on paper, a4, 2014

Pencil on paper, a4, 2014

beating

Fire-Poker Zen

Hakuin used to tell his pupils about an old woman who had a teashop, praising her understanding of Zen. The pupils refused to believe what he told them and would go to the teashop to find out for themselves.

Whenever the woman saw them coming she could tell at once whether they had come for tea or to look into her grasp of Zen. In the former case, she would serve them graciously. In the latter, she would beckon the pupils to come behind her screen. The instant they obeyed, she would strike them with a fire-poker.

Nine out of ten of them could not escape her beating.

 

 

transcribed by Nyogen Senzaki & paul reps

hell

graphite on paper, a4, 2014

graphite on paper, a4, 2014

cap.

I am no Marxist but I probably love Marx more than many Marxists who only believe in him. I made it my duty to use the Marxist lever to develop insights: to enter the thinking LABORATORY on a daily basis; and what do I find? money is not CAPITAL at all. CAPACITY is CAPITAL.

Joseph Beuys ‘What is Money?’

sanguine on paper, 110 x 130 mm, 2014

sanguine on paper, 110 x 130 mm, 2014

blast and ruin

watercolour & graphite on paper, 110 x 130mm, 2014

watercolour & graphite on paper, 110 x 130mm, 2014

It is we [the workers] who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and in America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones! We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth. There is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. [...] That world is growing in this minute.

Buenaventura Durruti, spoken during the Spanish civil war to Pierre van Paassen.

 

blossom

He spoke fluidly about art, coincidentally I felt very sick.

Monologue by Robert Katz and Chris Morris here. much recommended.

graphite on paper, 130 x  200 mm, 2014

graphite on paper, 130 x 200 mm, 2014

 

i love drawing blossom

many

I am no Marxist but I probably love Marx more than many Marxists who only believe in him…

Joseph Beuys ‘What is Money?’

pencil and oil pastel on paper, a5,  2014

pencil and oil pastel on paper, a5, 2014

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